March 18, 2010

Thrifty Threads

Welcome to another installment of Thrifty Threads, AKA Most Stylish Compact-y Outfit, where readers model their favorite secondhand clothes.

A Compact-y outfit is used or recycled, from Goodwill, a thrift store, a consignment shop, ebay, craigslist, a yard sale, or anywhere else you find secondhand clothing.

Today's model is Non Consumer Girl, back for the third time on Thrifty Threads after debuting as the original TT model. It's still cold in most parts of the United States, but not in Australia, where she's from. They're still enjoying summer Down Under.

Non Consumer Girl put together this fabulous outfit from her local consignment shop, which carries a selection of designer clothing, handbags, scarves, and shoes (which must be new!). The black top is a quality jersey fabric from David Lawrence and cost $9. It has an interesting twist of fabric feature on the shoulder, and NCG estimates it would have cost about $99 retail. The asymmetrical, lined, chiffon animal-print Rodney Clarke skirt was $20. NCG says it's flowing and feels lovely to wear, and again, would have run at least $100 new. And the black leather never-worn sandals cost just $20, a fraction of the original price.

That's just $49 for a stylish and pretty summer outfit that would have cost several times that amount new. NCG became a brilliant shopper last year while she was following The Compact. In fact, she discovered this consignment shop that's just a five minute walk from her home. Now she's following a simple living plan that keeps her out of the mall, and focused on her family and keeping their lives healthy and happy. I love this post about how she went shopping with some girlfriends and found two handbags for an excellent bargain, but ended up taking them back. She really didn't need them because she likes the bags she already has. She says her Buy Nothing New year has had a lasting effect, and her consumption habits have changed for the better.

I can relate to that. When you spend so much time decluttering, everything that comes in has to go through a much more rigid screening process. Check out her blog and get inspired by her ambitious decluttering goals, her project to grow her own lettuce, her mixed results with composting in a small space with a Bokashi bin, the super-cute book bag she made for her daughter, and much more.

Thanks again Non Consumer Girl for that excellent photo! As always, you look fantastic! Now readers, it's your turn. Put on your favorite thrift store score, snap a photo, and send it to me at barton.angela@gmail.com. I can tell you I've been so inspired by your fabulous finds that I've done a bit of secondhand shopping myself, and I'll have a photo to show you soon. But I always need more, so keep them coming.

Please share your tips for secondhand shopping in the Comments section. And click here to check out previous installments of Thrifty Threads.

5 comments:

Alea said...

What a fun, as well as, frugal outfit! The Nonconsumer Girl has hit upon one of the great secrets of buying second hand - you can buy high quality items for a fraction of the price, which means you often buy higher quality used than you would if you bought new!

Catherine @ The Vegan Good Life said...

Stylish threads to be had across the globe. Love it!

It's great she has that shop five minutes away. I pop by my thrift shop on the way to do my food shopping, and frequency really does pay off.

Consignment shops are a great place if you like designer labels, and to sell. I've sold some pricey Anthropologie items that I regret spending so much money on. I at least recouped a fraction of the cost and know someone else is using them. Although now I generally donate to charitable thrift.

Forest Parks said...

As always a great buy and great feature. I keep meaning to send in a pic for thrifty threads!

Thanks,
Forest.
http://frugalzeitgeist.com

Non Consumer Girl said...

Hi Angela,

Thanks for the featuring me!

Cheers
Non Consumer Girl

Simple in France said...

So, as much as I loved shopping at consignment shops in the US, I find that I can't get as many used clothes here in France. People just don't go through things as quickly here. Probably it's a good thing, but when I go to buy 'new' clothes, I don't know what I'm going to do.

I might actually have to buy really new clothes.